This was one of the few attempts I made at cookies this year. (I really need to try to do holiday baking this year. We’ll see if I have the time/energy, but I’m at least thinking about it, which is a good sign.

This was the recipe I used to break in my stand mixer (STAND MIXER Y’ALL), and with a combination of lemon curd and white chocolate chip, it’s hard to get better than that. And what better way to start than by making your own lemon curd to make these? I’ll link my recipe in the ingredients list.

Lemon Curd White Chocolate Chip Cookies
Makes at least two batches of cookies

Ingredients

  • 6 T butter at room temperature
  • .5 c white sugar
  • .5 c dark brown sugar
  • 1 egg
  • .25 c lemon curd
  • 1 t lemon zest
  • 1.75 c flour
  • .75 t baking soda
  • dash baking powder
  • pinch salt
  • 1 c white chocolate chips

Preheat your oven to 350. While it warms up, cream your butter and sugars together, and then mix in the egg, lemon curd (making of pics 1-2), and lemon zest (pics 3), followed by the flour, baking powder and soda, and salt. Then, slowly fold in your white chocolate chips (pic 4).

Roll the dough into small balls, and place on your baking sheet (see pic 5 for size). (If you’ve got parchment paper or a silicone baking mat, put that on, but otherwise, straight on the sheet is totally fine.) Bake for about 8 to 12 minutes, until they’re lightly golden brown on the edges (pic 6).

And then enjoy your amazing spring-esque cookies!

Churro. Waffles. That should really be all I need to say on this subject. Top with a bit of warmed dulce de leche, and you’ve got a perfect, quick weekend breakfast. (Seriously, this is ready to go in ten minutes, and your first waffle will be ready at about the twenty minute mark.) Plus, except for the buttermilk, you will probably have all of this in your pantry/fridge already! 

So what the hell are you wating for? CHURRO WAFFLES.

Churro Waffles
Makes ~8 waffles

Ingredients

  • 2 c buttermilk
  • 3 eggs
  • 6 T butter, melted
  • 1 T vanilla
  • 1 T dark brown sugar
  • 2 c flour
  • 2 t baking powder
  • pinch sea salt
  • 4 T butter, melted
  • .5 c white sugar
  • 1 T cinnamon
  • warmed dulce de leche to top

Take your buttermilk, eggs, melted butter, vanilla, and dark brown sugar, and whisk together. Then, add in your flour, baking powder, and salt, and whisk until just barely combined (it’s cool if it looks lumpy!). Let the batter sit while you warm up your waffle iron. 

Cook your waffles according to instructions, and prepare two bowls: one with melted butter, and a brush, and the other with the sugar and cinnamon mixed. Once your first waffle is done, brush each side with melted butter, and then dunk each side into the cinnamon sugar mixture. 

Spoon a bit of warmed dulce de leche over the waffles, and enjoy your sweet, quick weekend breakfast!

Deb posted this recipe over on Smitten Kitchen right as I was starting to plan Christmas meals and such, and really, this was utterly perfect timing. My da has a waffle iron (I don’t yet but that may be changing), and the idea of her Gramercy Tavern gingerbread in waffle form is utterly amazing. (Only used buttermilk in these, but next time? Absolutely using stout.) Not really sure how accurate the output on this was, as I split the batter to make a less gingerbready version for some of my sisters. Regardless, this was the perfect way to wake up Christmas morning. 

Deep Dark Gingerbread Waffles

Ingredients

  • 1 c flour
  • .75 t ground cinnamon
  • 1 T ground ginger
  • dash ground cloves
  • dash nutmeg
  • 1.5 t baking powder
  • .5 t baking soda
  • pinch sea salt
  • .5 c (really, shitton of options here – I used buttermilk, apple cider, yogurt thinned with milk, and even stout beer)
  • .5 c molasses
  • .5 c dark brown sugar
  • .25 c white sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 3 T butter, melted

Whisk together your flour, spices, salt, and baking sugar and powder.  In a smaller bowl, whisk together the molasses, dark brown and white sugar, egg, butter, and your additional wet ingredient of choice, until mixed together. (If the butter cools a bit and makes little white splotches in the batter, this is okay.) Mix together the wet and dry ingredients until just combined.

Heat your waffle iron to medium, and then use a rubber spatula to spoon the batter into the iron until the individual waffle molds are about ¾ths full. Be sure you have it greased, or these WILL stick. Cook according to your waffle iron’s directions, maybe a minute or two more if the batter is particularly moist. 

To remove, open, let rest for about 30 seconds, and use a tong and spatula to lift the corners out and wiggle it gently out of the mold. Let cool a little further, and then sprinkle with powdered sugar (and syrup if you really want to, but they likely won’t need them). 

These were the last of the cookie balls I made.  Still pretty damn good, but I don’t think the base recipe was quite as good as the pumpkin spice ones. Either way? More rum and chocolate is always a good thing. (I might need to make my own version of Jeni’s Rum Ball ice cream now. Because reasons. And science.  Let’s get ready to rum ball, etc etc etc.)

Rum Balls
Makes about 15 balls

Ingredients

  • 1 12 oz box vanilla wafers, crushed
  • 1 c powdered sugar
  • 2 T cocoa powder
  • 2 T corn syrup
  • 2/3 c rum (I again used Bacardi Superior)
  • white sugar (for rolling)

Again, for the vanilla wafers, if you’ve got a food processor, lucky you. Otherwise, again, just take a rolling pin, a bag, and your wafers, and go to town. 

Combine your crushed wafers, powdered sugar, and cocoa powder, and then add the corn syrup, and after, very slowly, the rum, until you have a barely combined mix. You can do all of this with a food processor on pulse too, which, again, if you have it, bully for you. If you don’t, roll your sleeves up, take a rubber spatula, and go. 

Take small chunks of your dough, roll them into small balls, and then toss in white sugar to coat. Chilling here is noted as optional, but it does make the flavor even better, in my opinion. Again, serve chilled or at room temp, as you prefer.

This, right here? This is likely going to be my base cookie ball recipe going forward.  These are the perfect blend of cookie, booze, and softness, and they taste AMAZING. And again, it involves lots of bashing of rolling pins and cookies, and one of the perennial flavors of this time of year – pumpkin spice. I used Bacardi Superior rum in this, this would likely be even better with a dark rum like Kraken. 

Pumpkin Spice Rum Balls
Makes about 20 balls

Ingredients

  • 1 box vanilla wafers, crushed
  • 1 c powdered sugar
  • 1 t ground cinnamon
  • .5 t nutmeg
  • .5 t ground ginger
  • .5 t ground cloves
  • .25 c rum (I used Bacardi Superior, Sailor Jerry’s was recommended)
  • 2 T pumpkin puree
  • .25 c white sugar for rolling

For the vanilla wafers, again, if you have a food processor to do the work for you, fantastic. Otherwise, take a box of vanilla wafers, put them in a bag, and then beat the shit out of them with a rolling pin. Enjoy the stress relief. You will likely need it around this time of year.

Mix together the crushed vanilla wafers, powdered sugar, and spices. In a separate, smaller bowl mix together the rum and pumpkin puree. Combine in the larger bowl until the batter’s just barely combined, as in pic 4. Take small chunks of your dough, roll them into small balls, and place them on a plate to rest as you roll them all up.

Take the balls, toss them in sugar to coat, and then chill in the fridge for an hour minimum. You can eat them either chilled or at room temp; just try not to eat all of them at once.

I made these… significantly earlier than I would care to admit, but things have been busy enough around here with the holidays and such that I haven’t gotten to posting these just yet.

I made these alcoholic cookie balls for the bosses this year (with a few leftover for me), and they also kind of served as tryouts for a good base ball recipe. This was definitely one of the more interesting ones, but not the one I’ll be ultimately using.  Very good recipe, though. And around this time of year, I’m all for alcoholic cookie balls.

This recipe isn’t quite perfect, as I ended up having to do some guessing on whether or not I had the right chocolate (long story short there was chocolate in my pantry but I didn’t know what kind it was as it had been taken out of the packaging and scattered all over the pantry), or enough of it. These ended up being a bit more moist following the base recipe, and I ended up adding powdered sugar to compensate. Not sure how much the Kahlua came through on this, but still a no bake, relative stress relieving assembly process.

Kahlua Balls
Makes appx 20 balls

  • 3 c crushed graham cracker crumbs (comes out to about two and a half of the small packages of graham crackers you find in a box)
  • .75 c powdered sugar
  • .25 c dark cocoa powder
  • 1.5 c semisweet chocolate, finely chopped
  • 1 t vanilla extract
  • 3 T corn syrup
  • .33 c Kahlua
  • 3 T brewed coffee
  • .5 c white sugar, for rolling

First, crush your graham crackers. If you have a food processor, you can do it that way. Alternatively, do what I did – take a large bag, add a package at a time, and beat it with a rolling pin until you have relatively uniform, fine crumbs. Trust me, it’s a pretty fantastic feeling. To chop your chocolate, use a large knife (such as the one in picture two above), and use it on the squares to kind of shave the chocolate off the squares, to a fine enough point that it will blend in the batter well eventually. 

Take your chocolate, cocoa powder, powdered sugar, and graham cracker crumbs, and whisk them together until you have a relatively uniform mix. Add in the vanilla, Kahlua, corn syrup, and coffee, and stir with a rubber spatula until the dough just barely comes together.  If it ends up too moist, add more powdered sugar to firm. 

Take chunks of dough and roll them into 1" balls. Put them on a separate plate to rest while you roll them all out. Once rolled, put them in the white sugar, toss to coat, and then place in a container. Put them in the fridge to chill – two to three days to develop the flavor is best.  And then, when you decide to eat them (and it will be sooner rather than later), bring them up to room temp, and enjoy!