This is a good, hearty, stick-to-your-ribs fall soup. It makes a hell of a lot, too, so I’m gonna have plenty of this for leftovers down the line (which is good, because the boyfriend loved it).  The most work you’re gonna put into this is peeling and chopping and dicing and mincing everything up, but once that’s done, you pretty much just throw it in the pot and let it sautee/simmer. 

I didn’t include the peanut garnish from the original recipe, however, this would probably be improved even further by a dollop of peanut butter in the soup. This is pretty damn good as is, though.

Massaman Curry Noodle Soup

Ingredients

  • 2 T olive oil
  • 2 Anaheim chiles (substitute red chile of choice if you don’t like Anaheims), seeded and minced
  • 5 large cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 T fresh ginger, peeled and minced
  • 6 medium carrots, peeled and diced
  • 2 sweet potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 6 c vegetable stock
  • 1 14 oz can coconut milk
  • 2 T massaman curry paste (or more to taste)
  • 2 large leaves kale, torn
  • 2 7 oz packages udon noodles (I used Sanukiya Jumbo Udon noodles)

Take your olive oil, heat it over medium high heat in a large pot, and add your Anaheims, garlic, and ginger, sauteeing until fragrant (about one minute). Add in your carrot and sweet potato, and sautee for another four to five minutes, stirring frequently.

Then, add your vegetable stock, coconut milk, and curry paste, bring to a boil, cover, and reduce to a simmer. Simmer for a good fifteen to twenty minutes, until your sweet potatoes and carrots in particular are good and fork tender. 

To finish, add in your torn kale and your udon noodles, and stir frequently, simmering until the noodles come apart and thicken slightly, and the kale starts to wilt. And then, enjoy your ridiculously hearty soup!

As my tomatoes are finally ripening on the vine and getting ready for harvest, I’m starting to find a lot of uses for the tomatoes I’ve been able to bring to full maturity (I lost at least half my plant due to the storms we encountered back in June). In addition, the less I have to heat stuff up when eating it, the better. So, this recipe from the Japanese Soul Cooking cookbook for cold udon noodles with tomatoes was pretty much exactly what I needed.

To bring out the tomato flavors even more, I ended up deciding to roast my tomatoes for about two hours; this, combined with the soy sauce in the recipe, made it even more delicious. Again, you can make your own udon noodles if you have at least a day or so to devote to it, or you can get the Shirayuki Jumbo Udon Noodles like I did, and only have to boil them for three minutes to get them ready.

Cold Udon with Roasted Tomatoes
Lasts six lunches as a main

Ingredients

  • 4 medium to large tomatoes (I used 5 medium)
  • sea salt
  • black pepper
  • olive oil
  • soy sauce
  • 3 servings udon noodles (one pack of the Shirayuki noodles I mentioned above)

Take your tomatoes and quarter them, and then half those quarters. Put them in a baking dish, and drizzle with olive oil, sea salt, and black pepper. Heat your oven to 300 (275 if it runs hot), and roast your tomatoes for two hours.

About a half hour from the tomatoes being done, put on about four cups of water into a pot, and bring it to a boil. (The instructions only recommended one cup per noodle serving, but I skewed slightly higher to ensure that there was enough water). Once boiling, add your noodles, and stir with a chopstick as they break apart, keeping all the noodles separate. Boil for three minutes, then remove to your colander.  Once ready, strain them in a colander, and then put the colander in a large bowl, and run cold water over them, filling the bowl (and the colander), and stir your noodles, as seen in picture 5. This helps them cool down and not get overcooked or mushy. Cool for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.  

Once your tomatoes are done, remove them from the oven and let them cool at least ten minutes. Once cooled, add in soy sauce to taste. The original recipe also recommends shiso, but I didn’t have any on hand (might grow it in the garden next year). 

Then, combine your tomatoes and noodles, ensuring that the noodles are fully coated, and either eat immediately, or chill further in the fridge. Either way, enjoy your minimal fuss meal!