Looking for a new way to try your vegetables? Just add beer and bacon!  Seriously. I found the green beans for a buck a pound on special last week, and it turns out Ale Asylum (a local brewer) just put out a new stout, so this was perfect timing in several senses. 

Stout Glazed Green Beans and Bacon

Ingredients

  • 4 slices bacon
  • 2 lbs green beans (note to self: reduce to 1 lb for the future, 2 lb was way too much)
  • .5 c stout (I used Ale Asylum’s Big Slick stout)
  • pinch smoked paprika, salt, and pepper

Cook your bacon in a pan to desired doneness. Remove, let cool, and chop. 

Add your green beans to the pan, and sear until slightly browned. Then, pour your stout in, drink the rest of the bottle, and cook until the beer reduces into a glaze (about ten minutes or so). Sprinkle with smoked paprika, salt, pepper, and chopped bacon, and toss in a serving dish to combine!

Deb posted this recipe over on Smitten Kitchen right as I was starting to plan Christmas meals and such, and really, this was utterly perfect timing. My da has a waffle iron (I don’t yet but that may be changing), and the idea of her Gramercy Tavern gingerbread in waffle form is utterly amazing. (Only used buttermilk in these, but next time? Absolutely using stout.) Not really sure how accurate the output on this was, as I split the batter to make a less gingerbready version for some of my sisters. Regardless, this was the perfect way to wake up Christmas morning. 

Deep Dark Gingerbread Waffles

Ingredients

  • 1 c flour
  • .75 t ground cinnamon
  • 1 T ground ginger
  • dash ground cloves
  • dash nutmeg
  • 1.5 t baking powder
  • .5 t baking soda
  • pinch sea salt
  • .5 c (really, shitton of options here – I used buttermilk, apple cider, yogurt thinned with milk, and even stout beer)
  • .5 c molasses
  • .5 c dark brown sugar
  • .25 c white sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 3 T butter, melted

Whisk together your flour, spices, salt, and baking sugar and powder.  In a smaller bowl, whisk together the molasses, dark brown and white sugar, egg, butter, and your additional wet ingredient of choice, until mixed together. (If the butter cools a bit and makes little white splotches in the batter, this is okay.) Mix together the wet and dry ingredients until just combined.

Heat your waffle iron to medium, and then use a rubber spatula to spoon the batter into the iron until the individual waffle molds are about ¾ths full. Be sure you have it greased, or these WILL stick. Cook according to your waffle iron’s directions, maybe a minute or two more if the batter is particularly moist. 

To remove, open, let rest for about 30 seconds, and use a tong and spatula to lift the corners out and wiggle it gently out of the mold. Let cool a little further, and then sprinkle with powdered sugar (and syrup if you really want to, but they likely won’t need them).