This, however? This was a HUGE mistake. Pro tip kids: Do not eat salmon you got on sale raw on the second day after you unwrap it. It ends with you throwing up in a Loop restaurant on the way home. Writing the recipe down because maybe I’ll overcome my aversion to it down the road. 

Marinated Salmon Sashimi Salad

Ingredients

  • 1 lb salmon (seriously, make sure it’s sashimi grade or it will end poorly), sliced into thin strips
  • 1 T miso
  • 1 T mirin
  • 1 T soy sauce
  • 1 t sesame oil
  • pinch shichimi
  • dash lemon juice

Whisk together all of your ingredients except for the lemon juice, pour it over your sliced salmon and toss, and top with a bit of lemon juice. 

This? This is amazing. Especially if you live near a high concentration of Asian groceries and can find a bunch of these ingredients for cheap, and salmon goes on sale for the right price. A nice Thai riff on the classic salmon chowder, and makes the apartment smell amazing. 

Thai Style Salmon Chowder

Ingredients

  • 2 T olive oil
  • 4 oz shiitake mushrooms, stems removed and sliced thin
  • 5 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 inch piece of ginger, peeled and grated
  • 1 large tomato, roughly chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, diced large
  • 2 stalks lemon grass, outer layers removed and cut into 3-inch pieces
  • 10 kaffir lime leaves (you can get these for super cheap at Asian grocery stores, trust me)
  • 1 qt chicken stock
  • 1 13 oz can coconut milk
  • 1 lb salmon, skin removed and cut into .5 inch pieces (save the skin)
  • .25 c fish sauce
  • .25 c fresh lime juice

Heat a large pot over high heat. Add the olive oil, and once it starts to shimmer, add your sliced shiitake, and sautee until deeply bronzed (about 7 to 10 minutes). Then, stir in the garlic and ginger and cook until fragrant (a minute or so), followed by the tomato, bell pepper, lime leaves, and lemongrass, cooking until the tomatoes release juice and the bell pepper just barely starts to wilt. 

Add in the chicken stock and coconut milk and stir together, bringing to a simmer. Once steadily simmering, reduce the heat to medium low, and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes. 

While the soup simmers, heat a small pan with olive oil over medium high heat, add your salmon skin, and cook on each side for about three minutes, until crispy. (Mine didn’t quite work out that way due to the sheer amount, but I tried and got pretty close!  See pics 8 and 9). 

Once your salmon skin is ready, add the salmon chunks, fish sauce, and lime juice in, and cook another minute or two, until the salmon that you can see is cooked. (The residual heat will take care of cooking it the rest of the way.)

Taste and adjust to your tastes, add a bit of salmon skin for garnish to your bowl as you scoop it out, and enjoy your ridiculously good soup. 

The Atlantic salmon that I like at the grocery store I typically shop at only goes on sale a few times a year. Recently was one of those times, and this recipe came my way just as it did, so really, this was one of those absolutely perfectly timed discoveries. This was also the final recipe I used my old oven on (I roasted the salmon significantly ahead of my using it so that it didn’t go bad and put it in the fridge until I finally made the honeyed cherries.)  Farewell, old oven and your fire setting tendencies; you will not be missed.

Balsamic and salmon, and honey and cherries seem like pretty natural pairings, but combine all of it in one dish, and the flavor combination is absolutely amazing. 

Balsamic Roasted Salmon with Honeyed Cherries
Lasts approximately 3 to 4 lunches

Ingredients

  • minimum 1 lb salmon
  • salt
  • 2 T olive oil
  • 3 T balsamic vinegar

Honeyed Cherries

  • 2 T olive oil
  • 3 T honey
  • 2 c cherries, pitted (see cherry almond dutch baby recipe for pitting tips)
  • 2 T balsamic vinegar

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.  If your cherries are not already depitted, do so now while your oven is heating up. Take your salmon, place it skin side down a baking sheet. Sprinkle liberally with salt, drizzle with the olive oil and balsamic vinegar, and roast for 8 to 10 minutes, depending on how thick the salmon is.

Meanwhile, on your stovetop, combine the honey and olive oil, and bring to a light simmer. Add the cherries, and simmer again, adding the balsamic vinegar not long after. Once the balsamic vinegar has been simmered in, remove from heat.

And then, combine it all onto a plate or whatever you’re storing it in. Layer the salmon over the cherries for maximum pretty.

This is a quick little recipe, perfect for when you’re feeling dead exhausted at the end of a work week + overtime at your old job.  I probably could’ve let the salmon sit in the tea leaves and salt a bit longer (maybe up to a half hour next time?), especially as it had spent the day defrosting in the fridge, but the result I got was still pretty damn good.  

Don’t like lapsang souchong? Don’t worry!  According to the original recipe, this also goes well with oolongs and greens.

Lapsang Souchong Poached Salmon
Lasts two lunches as main

Ingredients

  • 1 lb salmon (original recommends sockeye, I went with Atlantic)
  • 5 t lapsang souchong tea (loose leaf works best)
  • 2.25 c water
  • salt

Take your salmon, sprinkle it with 1.5 t of the lapsang souchong and salt, and wrap it back up, letting it sit at room temperature for at least ten minutes (though, as I mentioned, you could probably up the time without risking food poisoning).

Meanwhile, put your remaining 3.5 t lapsang souchong and your 2.25 c water together in a small pot and bring to a boil.  Once boliing, reduce to a simmer for 2 minutes, and then remove from heat.  Add the salmon to the tea, and let sit in the pot, uncovered, for about 6 to 10 minutes; 7 minutes to get the rare doneness I got in the final picture. Be sure that the tea is covering the filets; mine wasn’t fully covering the salmon, and I had to turn one cut over to get everything properly poached.

I had some extra salmon from the Japanese glazed pan-seared salmon I made last week, and wanted to use it up before it went bad.  The recipe I used was originally made for use with scallops, but honestly, it works pretty well with the salmon; I just pan sear it, and then make the sauce and pour it over the seared salmon.  I also give more detail in my directions than in the original recipe, as it assumes you know certain things.

Maple-Miso Salmon

Ingredients

  • salmon
  • olive oil
  • .25 c rice vinegar (reduced from original recipe bc I didn’t have .5 c on hand)
  • 2 T maple syrup
  • 2 T white miso paste

Heat your olive oil over high, and pan sear your salmon, cooking for three minutes on each side, enough to leave the center still good and pink. 

Reduce your heat to medium high, and add your vinegar, maple, and miso, stirring with a whisk to get the miso paste to combine into the maple syrup and vinegar.  It may not fully combine, and that’s okay.  Simmer, until reduced and thickened.  

Pour your sauce over your salmon, and enjoy!

EDIT: But make sure your salmon is still good first. That’s important. Urk.

This ended up being something I threw together pretty quickly, as I wanted to use the fish while it was still fresh, and I was originally planning on being out tonight (short story, didn’t end up happening, yay for sleep debt and introversion overcompensating for being social the night before).  Either way, simple flavors and quick prep time, combined with a quick pan sear, make this pretty spectacular.

Japanese Glazed Pan Seared Salmon
Lasts 2 lunches as a main

Ingredients

  • 1 lb salmon
  • olive oil
  • .25 c soy sauce
  • .25 c brown sugar
  • 1 T rice vinegar

Combine the soy sauce, brown sugar, and rice vinegar in a bowl, stirring until the brown sugar is dissolved, and then place your salmon in the bowl, marinating for about five minutes on each side.  You could probably go for longer, if you wanted more flavor infused.  

Heat your olive oil over high, and then sear your salmon, cooking for three minutes on each side, enough to turn it lighter pink, but not enough to cook it all the way through.  While your salmon cooks, take the remaining marinade and bring it to a simmer over medium high heat, simmering for five minutes. Then, pour the glaze over the salmon, and enjoy!

This is one of those recipes when you’re looking for something nice and simple, but with an amazing taste.  Plus, wine + fish + herbs = you can’t go wrong, generally.  Also, quite quick to make.  Really, not too many ways you can go wrong here.

Simple White Wine Poached Salmon
Lasts 2-3 lunches as a main course

Ingredients

  • 1 lb salmon, either in filets or in one big cut
  • .5 c white wine (I used Cupcake Winery’s Angel Food)
  • .5 c water
  • 1 t butter
  • 3 sprigs fresh thyme (I used ground, did a few dashes)
  • .25 c fresh basil leaves

Combine your white wine, water, and herbs, and bring to a simmer over medium heat.  Once simmering, add your salmon skin side down (accidentally did it flesh side down for a few minutes, whoops), cover with a lid, and cook between five to ten minutes, depending on how done you want it.  I did 7 minutes, that got it the equivalent of medium rare.