So, hey kids. I’m back. Kinda. Just getting back into the swing of this, and I miiight have a not insignificant amount of recipes I should finally write up.

Basically: unemployment and depression are rough, and getting yourself stabilized after all of the above is even more fun. For now, I appear to be settled enough that I finally feel comfortable getting back to this blog. So. Sorry for kinda disappearing since September, and thank you for sticking with me.

Pork belly is becoming a thing right now, and luckily for me, I have several Asian markets in the Chicago area that do cheap as shit (and well cut) slabs of pork belly. I came across this recipe on Lucky Peach, and decided to give it a shot. One major note – the original recipe calls for you to brown it on top of the time it spends in the oven, but to be very honest, it’s perfect as is after it comes out of the oven.

Momofuku Pork Belly
Makes however much pork belly you want; above was appx 2.5 lbs

Ingredients

  • Desired amount of pork belly (again, above was in one package from their meat counter, about 2.5 lbs I would guess; original recipe said skinless, I got mine with the skin on, didn’t make any large difference)
  • 1 T plus 1 t/lb sea salt
  • 1 T plus 1 t/lb sugar
  • a dash of fresh ground black pepper

The night before you want to make your pork belly, season it with salt and sugar, and a few twists of black pepper from the grinder. Cover it (I used one of the many many containers I have lying around) and let it sit in the fridge overnight.

Day of, preheat your oven to 450. Put your belly in a pan, and then sear at 450 for about a half hour. Turn it down to 275, and let it roast slowly another hour or two (I want to say mine sat for closer to the two hour mark at 275), until it’s nice and tender (but not mushy. ew).

Let it cool to room temperature, wrap it up/put it in a container in the fridge to store, and then warm it and nom as you desire!

 

Advertisements

“You begin to suspect your bowl is a portal to the meat dimension… In order to finish this bowl, you must have Understanding of your limits, Knowledge to control your pace, Courage to face this unrelenting tide of beef, and Diligence to persevere against this colossal challenge." 

So, one of the things you can do to raise your stats in Persona 4 is to take the Aiya Bottomless Beef Bowl Challenge. On rainy days, you go to the Chinese restaurant, and for 3000 yen (~$30), you get a huge ass beef bowl that you have to try to finish. You can’t actually finish the beef bowl until you have all five stats maxed out (and then it’s free), so typically when you do it, you get three of four random stats increased, which is super useful in game. 

This is basically a combination of two existing recipes (Pixelated Provisions, and the now defunct Gourmet Gaming), but I like the end result I got better than the other two recipes. (I’ll likely include the onions on another run through, but I mostly just wanted the meat, egg, and rice for this.)

I’m thinking of trying something similar with reverse engineering recipes from the Odin Sphere remake, so any tag suggestions for this kind of thing would be great!

Aiya Bottomless Beef Bowl

Ingredients

  • Steak, sliced thin (note: I got chuck steak for this, about a pound and a half, and that lasted for two servings; get something reasonably priced that you can get in large quantities)
  • 3 T mirin
  • 3 T sake
  • 3 T sugar
  • 9 T aged dark soy sauce
  • 1 T sesame oil
  • 3 cloves garlic, grated
  • 3 T grated ginger
  • rice 
  • egg

Whisk together your mirin, sake, sugar, and soy sauce. Take your steak, slice it thin to your taste (you can see the approximate size I got from my photos), and marinate in the mirin/sake/sugar/soy sauce mix in the fridge. I let mine sit covered in the fridge for the better part of a day; you should marinate it for a minimum of fifteen minutes. 

About an hour out from when you’re looking to eat, toss together your rice according to its instructions in your rice cooker, and let it do its thing. 

Fifteen minutes out from when you’re looking to eat, take a large pan, heat it to medium high, and add the sesame oil. Take your grated ginger and garlic, and fry for about two minutes tops, until fragrant. Then, take your steak and marinade, and cook for about ten minutes, until your steak is browned on all sides (see difference between pics 4 and 5). 

As your steak gets close to being done, heat a small pan and a dash of olive oil over high, and fry your egg until you get your desired doneness (I like having a sunny side up with a runny yolk). 

Scoop out your rice, add a bunch of the steak, and then drop the egg on top, and open your portal to the meat dimension!

I was able to find this roast for $.99/lb quite a while ago, and it’s just been hanging out in the freezer waiting for the perfect recipe. This is definitely it. I would’ve never thought of using lemon zest in a rub, but as it turns out, it goes really well, especially with all the spices mentioned here. Definitely going on the keeper list.

Roast Chicken with Plums

Ingredients

Roast Chicken

  • zest of 2 large lemons
  • 2 T ground sumac
  • 4 t sea salt
  • 1 T fresh ground pepper
  • 1 t cinnamon
  • 1 t allspice
  • 4 T olive oil
  • 6 garlic cloves, grated or minced (I went minced)
  • whole chicken (original recipe recommended 2 4ish lb chickens, I went with one big almost 10 lb one)
  • 1 bunch thyme (or ground, if you’re me and don’t want to get the fresh herbs)
  • 1 T lemon juice (fresh squeezed ideal)

Plums

  • 2.5 lbs plums, halved, quartered if on the larger side
  • (original recipe mentions shallots, I omitted them, didn’t want to make the grocery run)
  • 2 T honey
  • 1 T olive oil
  • .5 t cinnamon
  • pinch allspice
  • 1 bay leaf torn in half
  • 2 T water

Take your lemon zest, and mix in the sumac, salt, pepper, cinnamon, allspice, the minced garlic, and 3 T of the olive oil. The resulting mixture should feel like wet sand. Rub the mixture all over the chicken, including the insides. Take your thyme bunch and rest it inside the cavity (or if you’re me, just sprinkle a bunch of thyme in the cavity). Let the rubbed chicken marinate in the fridge for a minimum of one hour, or up to 24 hours. 

Either way, once you’re ready to roast the chicken, take it out of the fridge and bring it to room temperature, letting it sit for about 30 minutes. Preheat your oven to 450.

While the chicken sits and the oven preheats, take the plums, honey, water, olive oil, cinnamon, allspice, and bay leaf, and toss together in a roasting pan. Spread the mixture evenly on the bottom of the roasting pan. Once the oven is preheated, transfer the chicken to the roasting pan, resting it on top of the plums, and roast for 30 minutes to start.

After 30 minutes, take 1 T of lemon juice and the remaining 1 T olive oil from earlier, mix it together, and drizzle over the chicken. Put the chicken back in the oven, and continue to roast for another 45 minutes, until cooked all the way through. 

Let your chicken rest under a foil blanket for 10 minutes once it’s been removed from the oven, and then enjoy!

Back in December/January, rib roasts were available for super fucking cheap because of the holidays, so I got to try a new roast recipe. Not sure if I’ll try it again, but if nothing else, the gorgonzola sauce that goes with it is pretty great. 

Sage Crusted Rib Roast with Gorgonzola Cream Sauce

Ingredients

Rib Roast

  • 2 T olive oil
  • 1 semi boneless rib roast (this one was appx 7 lbs, I want to say?)
  • sea salt and pepper for sprinkling
  • 2 bunches fresh sage (or, if you’re me, a whole bunch of ground sage)
  • 1 large sweet onion, sliced
  • 1 c red wine
  • 2 c chicken or beef stock (I used chicken)

Gorgonzola Cream Sauce

  • 4 T butter
  • 1 T olive oil
  • 5 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 1 c dry white wine
  • 1 c heavy whipping cream
  • 1 T fresh ground pepper
  • 6 oz gorgonzola cheese crumbles
  • sea salt to taste

Preheat your oven to 450. Take your olive oil, and heat it in a large pan on high. Once warmed, sear each end of the rib roast, about 4 to 5 minutes a side, until nicely browned. 

In a roasting pan, mix together your stock and red wine, and add your sliced onion. Lay the roast on top of the onion, and then drizzle with the remaining olive oil, placing your sea salt, pepper, and sage to taste on the roast. Cover the roast with foil, and then roast at 450 for about 20 to 25 mins, and then reduce the heat to 350, roasting for another hour and a half (to get to rare). Here and there throughout the roasting, baste the roast with the wine/stock/juices mix. For the last half hour, remove the foil. 

In the last ten minutes or so, heat the butter, olive oil, and garlic over medium heat, cooking until the garlic is fragrant and soft, and just a bit caramelized, about five minutes. Add the white wine in and cook until reduced by a third, another fiveish minutes. Stir in the heavy whipping cream and gorgonzola, melting until you have a smooth sauce. Then, add in your pepper, a bit of sea salt to taste, and remove from heat.

Once your roast is removed, let cool for about fifteen to twenty minutes, serve with the gorgonzola sauce, and enjoy!

I picked up a ham for cheap from my school’s butchery program recently, and was looking through my recipes to see if there was something else I could try besides my mainstay ham recipe. I came across this recipe in my Pinterest, and I had all the ingredients on hand, so I thought, meh, why not?  I chose to stud my ham with cloves for this, but the recipe does not require it.

Dr. Pepper Glazed Ham 
Depends on the size of your ham; 5 lb ham lasted about a week for me

Ingredients

  • ham 
  • cloves to stud ham, to preference
  • .75 c packed dark brown sugar
  • .5 c Dr. Pepper
  • 2 T lime juice (original called for orange juice, didn’t have any to hand)
  • 2 t dijon mustard

Preheat your oven to 250. Take your ham out of the packaging, stud it with cloves, put it in your roasting pan, and tent tightly with aluminum foil. (The pictures you see are after having removed the foil tent). Roast the ham for about 17 minutes per pound (this was a 5 lb ham, so it was roasted for about an hour and a half). Ideally you should have a meat thermometer to check the internal temperature, but I didn’t, so I mainly just guessed.

When it gets down to the last ten minutes, combine the brown sugar, Dr. Pepper, lime juice, and dijon mustard in a pot, whisk together, bring to a simmer over medium high heat, and then simmer for about 8 minutes, until it reduces and thickens to a syrupy consistency. 

As soon as the syrup has thickened, take the foil off the ham, pour off any juices that have collected in the pan (if applicable) and brush the glaze over the ham. Return to the oven and bake for another half hour, until the glaze is sticky. Brush the collected glaze over the ham, let it rest for about a half hour to cool, and then enjoy your delicious labors!

Looking for a quick, delicious dinner? Try this!  The flank steak was on sale, so it was cheaper than it would’ve been normally, but everything else you should have in your pantry. 

Asian Steak Bites
Lasts 2 lunches

Ingredients

  • 1.75 lbs flank steak
  • .25 c soy sauce
  • 2 T honey
  • 1 T chili paste (I used sambal oelek) 
  • 2 T olive oil

Slice your flank steak into strips, and then into bite size pieces. Place the pieces in a medium sized bowl.  In a separate bowl, whisk together the soy sauce, honey, and chili paste, and pour over the beef, stirring to mix well. Let the beef sit in the marinade for twenty minutes to a half hour.

Heat the olive oil in a pan over medium high heat, and then add the beef, cooking on all sides until browned (about 5 minutes total). Enjoy!

Looking for a new way to try your vegetables? Just add beer and bacon!  Seriously. I found the green beans for a buck a pound on special last week, and it turns out Ale Asylum (a local brewer) just put out a new stout, so this was perfect timing in several senses. 

Stout Glazed Green Beans and Bacon

Ingredients

  • 4 slices bacon
  • 2 lbs green beans (note to self: reduce to 1 lb for the future, 2 lb was way too much)
  • .5 c stout (I used Ale Asylum’s Big Slick stout)
  • pinch smoked paprika, salt, and pepper

Cook your bacon in a pan to desired doneness. Remove, let cool, and chop. 

Add your green beans to the pan, and sear until slightly browned. Then, pour your stout in, drink the rest of the bottle, and cook until the beer reduces into a glaze (about ten minutes or so). Sprinkle with smoked paprika, salt, pepper, and chopped bacon, and toss in a serving dish to combine!