So, it’s payday, which means I just did grocery shopping!  However, the vast majority of those groceries won’t be arriving until juuust after I make this post, so I need a little something something to tide me over until that happens.  Thus, Pasta Puttanesca (yes, it can translate to whore pasta :P).  

This is another one of those super effin’ cheap recipes, especially around the right time of year (farmer’s market has just moved to the Square by us, which means lots of vendors and cheap fresh basil, or basil plants) and with the right pantry.  Also, another really quick recipe.  All you should need to buy is basil, a hugeass can of diced tomatoes, anchovies (trust me!), and the pitted (trust me, it’ll save you a lot of work) kalamata olives.

Pasta Puttanesca
Lasts appx 5 meals, at least

Ingredients

  • Pasta (whatever kind and however much you want)
  • 2 T olive oil
  • 3-4 anchovy filets (trust me on this, you can skip it if you want, but they cook away and add a great flavor base)
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • a pinch of red pepper flakes
  • 6 cloves garlic, chopped (you know what I’ve said about me and garlic by now, I hope)
  • 1 28 oz can diced tomatoes
  • 10-15 pitted kalamata olives, chopped
  • 1 small bunch basil, chopped
  • 2 T capers (optional, but if you have them on hand, go for it)
  • ½ T brown sugar (I usually add this, but didn’t this time)

Start boiling the water for the pasta while you chop the onion, garlic, olives, and basil.  Once all that’s done, combine the olive oil, anchovies, onion, and garlic, and cook on medium for appx five minutes, or until the onion’s softened.  Then, add the tomatoes, olives, basil, and capers (if using), and simmer on low until the pasta is complete.  Take a taste, add the brown sugar if the sauce has too much of a bite for you.

Once the water’s boiling, add the pasta and cook according to directions, and drain.  Once that happens, add the pasta to the skillet and mix to combine the sauce and pasta.  

And, there you go!  Dinner in fifteen, twenty minutes tops!  Go eat!  Do whatever!  😀

So, this blog’s inaugural post is Budget Bytes’ Tangy Tomato Pasta!  Honestly, part of the reason that I picked this recipe was because it’s super cheap (most of these things, except for feta and maybe the tomato paste, should probably already be in your pantry), and because it’s super quick (this took about fifteen minutes, tops). Great if you’re feeling lazy (or, in my case, throat achey), or if you’re running low close to payday. 

Also, a note: I cook for one, and I’ll try to give you an idea of how long recipes last me, instead of servings. If this is my first time cooking a recipe (which, in this case, it is), I’ll likely edit it after the fact.

Tangy Tomato Pasta
Lasts appx 5 meals

Ingredients

  • Pasta (whatever amount you have handy, and whatever you have in your pantry; alternatively, whatever’s cheapest)
  • 3 T olive oil
  • Several cloves garlic, chopped (I tend to go a little heavier on the garlic; the recipe originally calls for one clove, can be done to taste)
  • Pinch dried basil, dried oregano, salt, rosemary, dried thyme, crushed red pepper (oops, forgot this), black pepper (you can go dried, ground, or fresh, whatever you have handy, really, for all of these)
  • 3 oz tomato paste (half a 6 oz can)
  • ½ t honey 
  • 3 oz feta (half a 6 oz package)

Boil a pot of water.  While you wait for it to reach a heavily rolling boil, in a separate skillet, turn the heat to medium to medium high, and combine the olive oil with the chopped garlic, dried basil, dried oregano, salt, rosemary, dried thyme, crushed red pepper, and black pepper.  Stir, and wait for it to start sizzling, and then cook for one more minute.  Add the tomato paste, turn the heat down to medium, and stir and cook until the mixture is a few shades darker red (appx 2 mins).  Turn off the heat, and add the honey.  Once the pot is boiling, cook the pasta per the instructions, drain, and then add to the skillet and stir until the pasta is coated.  Add the feta (either 2 oz straight to the skillet and stir to combine, with the remainder for garnish, or just all of it to the skillet). 

And then, nom!