Ham is one of my favorite things to make, point blank. And let me tell you, this is one of those “why the hell didn’t I think of this sooner” moments? As it turns out, Dr. Pepper works unbelievably well as a glaze base, and when you roast it? Oh man. (A British friend of mine has recommended boiling a ham in a whole 2L bottle of Dr. Pepper. I am incredibly intrigued to try this out.)

Dr. Pepper Glazed Ham
Makes: ham. Many ham. 

Ingredients

  • A ham. Go with whatever you can get the most of for cheapest on sale. This one was a ten pounder on sale from Christmas.
  • .75 c packed brown sugar
  • .5 c Dr. Pepper
  • 2 T orange juice (fresh as possible)
  • 2 t Dijon mustard

Take your ham. Preheat the oven to 250. If you have an oven bag, click on the recipe for those instructions. If you don’t, place your ham face down in your roasting dish, be sure to remove the plastic cap on the bone, wrap your ham tightly in foil, take out at least one of the racks in your oven (cause these things are bigger/taller than you think), and put in the ham. Figure about seventeen minutes per pound for roasting time – a ten pound ham will take about two and a half hours. Go do other things, like nap, or play video games, or attempt to do a batch of cookie dough that will fail because you don’t have enough flour.

About ten minutes before the ham is finished with the initial roast, combine the brown sugar, Dr. Pepper, orange juice, and mustard in a small pot, and bring to a simmer, cooking for about 8 minutes, until reduced to .75 c and thick and syrupy.

When your ham is done roasting, remove it from the oven, peel off the foil, and gently pour the juices that have gathered in the pan into your sink. Then, slowly pour the glaze over the ham, and brush it liberally with the glaze while you’re at it. Put it back in the oven for another half hour, until the glaze gets sticky. Then, remove from the oven, brush it with the glaze again, and let sit for a half hour or so to cool.

Then, enjoy your ridiculously good ham.

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I picked up a ham for cheap from my school’s butchery program recently, and was looking through my recipes to see if there was something else I could try besides my mainstay ham recipe. I came across this recipe in my Pinterest, and I had all the ingredients on hand, so I thought, meh, why not?  I chose to stud my ham with cloves for this, but the recipe does not require it.

Dr. Pepper Glazed Ham 
Depends on the size of your ham; 5 lb ham lasted about a week for me

Ingredients

  • ham 
  • cloves to stud ham, to preference
  • .75 c packed dark brown sugar
  • .5 c Dr. Pepper
  • 2 T lime juice (original called for orange juice, didn’t have any to hand)
  • 2 t dijon mustard

Preheat your oven to 250. Take your ham out of the packaging, stud it with cloves, put it in your roasting pan, and tent tightly with aluminum foil. (The pictures you see are after having removed the foil tent). Roast the ham for about 17 minutes per pound (this was a 5 lb ham, so it was roasted for about an hour and a half). Ideally you should have a meat thermometer to check the internal temperature, but I didn’t, so I mainly just guessed.

When it gets down to the last ten minutes, combine the brown sugar, Dr. Pepper, lime juice, and dijon mustard in a pot, whisk together, bring to a simmer over medium high heat, and then simmer for about 8 minutes, until it reduces and thickens to a syrupy consistency. 

As soon as the syrup has thickened, take the foil off the ham, pour off any juices that have collected in the pan (if applicable) and brush the glaze over the ham. Return to the oven and bake for another half hour, until the glaze is sticky. Brush the collected glaze over the ham, let it rest for about a half hour to cool, and then enjoy your delicious labors!

My mom got me some lovely little ramekins as part of my Christmas gifts, and the moment I came across this recipe, I knew this was what I was going to use to break them in. I altered the recipe a bit, as I’m not the biggest fan of spinach, and honestly didn’t want to go out in the cold to get shallots. Regardless, the resulting dish is pretty fantastic, and makes a perfect Sunday breakfast – especially when served with mimosas using the leftover champagne. 

Champagne Baked Eggs with Crispy Ham
Makes 4 ramekins

Ingredients

  • 1 c champagne
  • 4 eggs
  • pinch sea salt and pepper
  • 1 T melted butter for ramekins
  • .75 c grated gruyere
  • 2 oz ham, sliced into thin strips

Preheat your oven to 350. Melt your butter, and split between the ramekins. Divide your cup of champagne equally between the four ramekins, and crack an egg into each one, adding a pinch of sea salt and pepper on top. Fry your ham in a skillet over medium heat until it’s your desired level of crispy (I went mildly crispy), and split between the ramekins. Sprinkle the gruyere over each ramekin. 

Put the ramekins on a baking sheet (or pizza pan in my case), and bake for 13 to 15 minutes (the deeper the ramekin, the longer it’ll need to bake). Let rest for about five minutes, and then enjoy!

This ham was one of the first recipes I ever made from Inn at the Crossroads, and man, even though the original recipe is vague as hell, it does not disappoint. It will take a bit of time to stud the ham, and the roasting will take a bit out of your day, but if you have this going at the same time as a crock pot recipe, it won’t seem like any time at all.  

Yes, the ham does come out black towards the end (but it’s only the skin, it’s not burnt, and the underside is only dark bc of it cooking in the juices), but trust me, it’s fantastic. (Random note: I have never covered my ham in foil when roasting, this will probably change the blackening of the skin.  And even then it doesn’t make it completely inedible.)

Ham with Cloves, Honey, and Dried Cherries
Lasts a really long time; I’m coming up on week 2 of eating this

Ingredients

  • 10 lb ham (mine was 12, bone-in)
  • cloves enough to stud your ham
  • .5 c apple cider
  • .5 c honey
  • .5 c red wine vinegar
  • 2 large handfuls of dried cherries

Mix your honey, red wine vinegar, and apple cider in a small pot over medium heat, stewing for ten minutes.  Preheat your oven to 325 (mine was at 300), or whatever your ham’s roasting instructions indicate.  While that stews, stud your ham with cloves, and place it in your roasting pan (I use a glass pan).  Pictures 2 and 3 are a good guide for how studded it should be.  After ten minutes, your ham should be studded, and your glaze will be ready; pour it over the ham.

My ham’s roasting instructions suggested fifteen to twenty minutes per pound at 325 to roast; as this was 12 pounds, I skewed towards four hours, though I probably could’ve gone for the three and a half and been fine. Either way, your ham will come with instructions; they will probably be similar to the previous instructions, but check them before you go with what I suggest. Baste your ham at least once or twice an hour with a brush, to keep everything moist.

Once the ham is done, remove it to either a serving platter or whatever you’ll be storing it in, and then add your cherries to the remaining juices. You’ll cook these juices down until the cherries plumpen and the sauce thickens a bit (which was about twenty five minutes at 300 for me).  Once the sauce is done, store it separately as a side.

And then feast like you’re in King’s Landing.  Just hopefully not at the Purple Wedding.