Want a simple, quick, savory meal that will make your place smell delicious, and will include stuff you likely already have on hand? Then look no further than this. I’ve had puttanesca sauce on pasta before, but the idea of making the sauce into a shakshuka type dish never occurred before Smitten Kitchen put this recipe up. And let me tell you, it is afuckingmazing. So, pick up some diced tomatoes and kalamata olives, and give it a try. 

Eggs in Purgatory Puttanesca
Lasts 3 meals, if eating by yourself

Ingredients

  • 2 T olive oil
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 2 T-ish pitted kalamata olives
  • 1 t capers, drained and rinsed
  • 1 anchovy filet (add a few more if you want a more savory flavor)
  • 1 T dried Greek oregano
  • pinch red pepper flakes
  • 1 14 oz can diced tomatoes (I went with fire roasted, will probably go with 2 cans next time)
  • sea salt to taste
  • 1-4 eggs
  • .25 c grated parmesan (or, if you have it on hand, parmigiano-reggiano)
  • 1-4 slices of bread

Heat your olive oil in a medium sized pan over medium heat. While the pan warms, take your garlic cloves, kalamata olives, capers, anchovy, oregano, and red pepper flakes, and mince them together until you have a nice small pile. Take the heap, and add it to the pan, stirring and cooking for two minutes, until nicely fragrant.  Slowly add in your tomatoes, and a bit of sea salt, and lower the heat to medium low, stirring and simmering for five minutes. Take a taste of the sauce, and see how you like it. 

Then, make small indentations into the sauce, and crack your eggs into it. Cover the whites with sauce and cheese, and then cover and cook for five minutes, until the whites have set. If you want to toast your bread, now is a good time to do so; if you have a gas stove, just toast it over the burner, or toast it under the broiler for a few minutes. 

Then, scoop out your sauce, and an egg, into a bowl with your bread, and enjoy!

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Looking for a cheap as hell, quick, delicious, simple dinner? You’re looking at it. The most expensive thing you will need to buy for this will be the ravioli (and even that is $5 for a package, tops). Most of the rest of this you should already have in your pantry. And plus, once fresh herbs come into season, this’ll get even better (I used dried basil because basil bunches are still expensive as hell around here right now). 

Tomato Balsamic Ravioli
Lasts four lunches as a main

Ingredients

  • 1 14 oz can diced tomatoes
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 1 T olive oil
  • 2 T balsamic vinegar (or to taste)
  • sea salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 large tomato, diced
  • 1 lb ravioli (or however much comes in whatever package you’re buying)
  • 2 T fresh basil, chopped (I used dried basil)

Take your ravioli, and cook it according to the instructions on your package. Drain, run some cold water over it, and set aside.

Heat your olive oil over medium, and then take your diced tomatoes and onion and sautee for 5 to 7 minutes. Add in the balsamic vinegar, sea salt and pepper, followed by the fresh diced tomato, and cook for another five minutes. 

Once five minutes has passed, take the ravioli, toss it with the tomato mixture, sprinkle your chopped fresh basil on it, and serve!  Maybe add a bit of parm if there’s not enough cheese in your ravioli for your tastes. 

This is the first meatloaf I’ve ever made, and I can honestly say it’s a pretty damn good meatloaf to start out with. Would probably substitute panko for oats in the future, but otherwise? Get a good gouda, good bacon, and ground meat, all from your local farmers market if you can, and enjoy the awesomeness of this meatloaf.

Bacon and Gouda Stuffed Meatloaf with Tomato Marmalade
Lasts an incredibly long time (about two weeks’ worth of lunches, minimum)

Ingredients

  • 1 lb ground beef
  • .75 lb ground pork
  • 2 t grated onion
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • .25 c oats
  • .5 t garlic salt
  • 1 t onion powder
  • 8 slices of bacon, cooked
  • 1 c grated Gouda (I used smoked gouda, you could also use cheddar)

Tomato Marmalade

  • 1 14 oz can diced tomatoes (fire roasted if you can find them for a reasonable price)
  • 1.5 T balsamic vinegar
  • 2 T dark brown sugar
  • .25 t crushed red pepper

Cook your bacon to its desired doneness, and while it cooks, grate your Gouda. As soon as the bacon is done, remove it to a paper towel. Combine all ingredients for the loaf except for the bacon and gouda in a large bowl, using your hands if necessary to mash it together.

Ideally, for the loaf, you have a bread pan, but if you don’t, use a cake pan, and shape the loaf in the bottom of the pan with half the meat. Lay down half the gouda, then the bacon, then the other half of the gouda on top, and form the top part of the loaf with the other half of the meat, sealing in the bacon and cheese. Preheat your oven to 350 (325 on my oven), and put the loaf in.

Immediately after the loaf is in the oven, put your tomatoes, balsamic, dark brown sugar, and crushed red pepper in a pot and stir to combine, bringing it to a boil over medium high heat. Once boiling, reduce to a simmer, and simmer for 30 minutes, until reduced by about half.

Once the marmalade is done, remove the loaf from heat and pour the marmalade on top of it. After that, it should cook for about ten minutes more. I actually set mine for an additional half hour, so that it was closer to an hour in the oven instead of the overall 40 minutes the recipe recommends. My loaf is likely more well done as a result (I haven’t cut far enough in to confirm).

And then, enjoy the noms!