This just in: converting a recipe back from being vegan and gluten free is difficult sometimes. However, the resulting bread that I got out of this? Amazing, and definitely going into the regular rotation once persimmons are back in season. (If you want the original gluten free and vegan version, it’s linked below.)

Persimmon Spice Bread

Ingredients

Bread

  • 2.5 c flour
  • 1 c sugar
  • 2 t baking powder
  • 1 t baking soda
  • 2 t cinnamon
  • 1 t nutmeg
  • 1 t ground cloves
  • .5 c milk
  • .5 c vegetable oil
  • 1 t vanilla extract
  • 1.5 c persimmon puree (you should be able to get this from about 4 large ripe persimmons)
  • 1 persimmon, sliced thin (I used about half of one)

Vanilla Glaze

  • .5 c powdered sugar
  • 1 t vanilla extract

Take your persimmons, skin them, and puree the fruit in the blender. Save half of one, and slice it into small slices. (If your persimmons are ripe enough, this will not be an issue. For Hachiyas, you want them super ripe, borderline soft. For Fuyus, you want them firm.)  Preheat your oven to 350. 

In a bowl, whisk together your dry ingredients, followed by the persimmon puree, then the milk, vegetable oil, and vanilla, until you have a coherent dough. Transfer the dough to your loaf pan, top with the persimmon slices from earlier, and bake for an hour at 350. 

While the bread bakes, whisk together your powdered sugar and vanilla to make the glaze. Once the bread has been removed from the oven, let cool for at least fifteen minutes before drizzling the glaze on top.

This, right here? This is likely going to be my base cookie ball recipe going forward.  These are the perfect blend of cookie, booze, and softness, and they taste AMAZING. And again, it involves lots of bashing of rolling pins and cookies, and one of the perennial flavors of this time of year – pumpkin spice. I used Bacardi Superior rum in this, this would likely be even better with a dark rum like Kraken. 

Pumpkin Spice Rum Balls
Makes about 20 balls

Ingredients

  • 1 box vanilla wafers, crushed
  • 1 c powdered sugar
  • 1 t ground cinnamon
  • .5 t nutmeg
  • .5 t ground ginger
  • .5 t ground cloves
  • .25 c rum (I used Bacardi Superior, Sailor Jerry’s was recommended)
  • 2 T pumpkin puree
  • .25 c white sugar for rolling

For the vanilla wafers, again, if you have a food processor to do the work for you, fantastic. Otherwise, take a box of vanilla wafers, put them in a bag, and then beat the shit out of them with a rolling pin. Enjoy the stress relief. You will likely need it around this time of year.

Mix together the crushed vanilla wafers, powdered sugar, and spices. In a separate, smaller bowl mix together the rum and pumpkin puree. Combine in the larger bowl until the batter’s just barely combined, as in pic 4. Take small chunks of your dough, roll them into small balls, and place them on a plate to rest as you roll them all up.

Take the balls, toss them in sugar to coat, and then chill in the fridge for an hour minimum. You can eat them either chilled or at room temp; just try not to eat all of them at once.

This ham was one of the first recipes I ever made from Inn at the Crossroads, and man, even though the original recipe is vague as hell, it does not disappoint. It will take a bit of time to stud the ham, and the roasting will take a bit out of your day, but if you have this going at the same time as a crock pot recipe, it won’t seem like any time at all.  

Yes, the ham does come out black towards the end (but it’s only the skin, it’s not burnt, and the underside is only dark bc of it cooking in the juices), but trust me, it’s fantastic. (Random note: I have never covered my ham in foil when roasting, this will probably change the blackening of the skin.  And even then it doesn’t make it completely inedible.)

Ham with Cloves, Honey, and Dried Cherries
Lasts a really long time; I’m coming up on week 2 of eating this

Ingredients

  • 10 lb ham (mine was 12, bone-in)
  • cloves enough to stud your ham
  • .5 c apple cider
  • .5 c honey
  • .5 c red wine vinegar
  • 2 large handfuls of dried cherries

Mix your honey, red wine vinegar, and apple cider in a small pot over medium heat, stewing for ten minutes.  Preheat your oven to 325 (mine was at 300), or whatever your ham’s roasting instructions indicate.  While that stews, stud your ham with cloves, and place it in your roasting pan (I use a glass pan).  Pictures 2 and 3 are a good guide for how studded it should be.  After ten minutes, your ham should be studded, and your glaze will be ready; pour it over the ham.

My ham’s roasting instructions suggested fifteen to twenty minutes per pound at 325 to roast; as this was 12 pounds, I skewed towards four hours, though I probably could’ve gone for the three and a half and been fine. Either way, your ham will come with instructions; they will probably be similar to the previous instructions, but check them before you go with what I suggest. Baste your ham at least once or twice an hour with a brush, to keep everything moist.

Once the ham is done, remove it to either a serving platter or whatever you’ll be storing it in, and then add your cherries to the remaining juices. You’ll cook these juices down until the cherries plumpen and the sauce thickens a bit (which was about twenty five minutes at 300 for me).  Once the sauce is done, store it separately as a side.

And then feast like you’re in King’s Landing.  Just hopefully not at the Purple Wedding.