This is a good, hearty, stick-to-your-ribs fall soup. It makes a hell of a lot, too, so I’m gonna have plenty of this for leftovers down the line (which is good, because the boyfriend loved it).  The most work you’re gonna put into this is peeling and chopping and dicing and mincing everything up, but once that’s done, you pretty much just throw it in the pot and let it sautee/simmer. 

I didn’t include the peanut garnish from the original recipe, however, this would probably be improved even further by a dollop of peanut butter in the soup. This is pretty damn good as is, though.

Massaman Curry Noodle Soup

Ingredients

  • 2 T olive oil
  • 2 Anaheim chiles (substitute red chile of choice if you don’t like Anaheims), seeded and minced
  • 5 large cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 T fresh ginger, peeled and minced
  • 6 medium carrots, peeled and diced
  • 2 sweet potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 6 c vegetable stock
  • 1 14 oz can coconut milk
  • 2 T massaman curry paste (or more to taste)
  • 2 large leaves kale, torn
  • 2 7 oz packages udon noodles (I used Sanukiya Jumbo Udon noodles)

Take your olive oil, heat it over medium high heat in a large pot, and add your Anaheims, garlic, and ginger, sauteeing until fragrant (about one minute). Add in your carrot and sweet potato, and sautee for another four to five minutes, stirring frequently.

Then, add your vegetable stock, coconut milk, and curry paste, bring to a boil, cover, and reduce to a simmer. Simmer for a good fifteen to twenty minutes, until your sweet potatoes and carrots in particular are good and fork tender. 

To finish, add in your torn kale and your udon noodles, and stir frequently, simmering until the noodles come apart and thicken slightly, and the kale starts to wilt. And then, enjoy your ridiculously hearty soup!

There are two awesome things about this recipe.  One, that the summer veggies are incredibly cheap this time of year at the farmer’s market, if not available in your own garden, and smell amazing while roasting. Two, that the core recipe is incredibly versatile, and can be changed by adding whatever spice you want.  In my case, I had an ex coworker give me a jar of Penzey’s balti mix that I ended out trying with this, and all the spices (there are entirely too fucking many for me to list out individually) played incredibly well with the veggies.

This was also my first time testing out the immersion blender that the amazing paintboxsoapworks got me, and let me tell you, it is AMAZING not having to put all of this in the blender in batches. If you can get one, do it, it’ll make your life so much easier/saner. I probably could’ve gotten it a bit finer, but honestly, this was my first time trying it out, so now I know it for next time!

Roasted Summer Veggie Soup

Ingredients

  • 4 carrots, peeled, halved lengthwise, and cut into two inch pieces
  • 4 large tomatoes, quartered and seeded
  • 2 medium zucchinis, halved lengthwise and cut into one inch pieces
  • 1 large red bell pepper, seeded and sliced
  • half of one large onion (yellow or white), sliced
  • 1 T fresh thyme leaves (I didn’t have fresh so I went with 1 t ground)
  • sea salt and pepper to taste
  • 6 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 2 T olive oil
  • 2 C chicken stock (can substitute vegetable stock to make it vegan)
  • seasoning of choice (recipe recommends .5 t smoked paprika, I went with several shakes of balti seasoning)

Heat your oven to 400, and place your vegetables on the sheet, placing the garlic at intermittent distances. Sprinkle with sea salt, thyme, and pepper, lightly drizzle on the olive oil, and toss to coat everything.

Roast your vegetables for 45 to 50 minutes, stirring occasionally, until tender and caramelized. Add your vegetables to the pot with the broth, your seasoning of choice, and more salt and pepper if you so choose. If using an immersion blender, use in the pot and blend until smooth.  If using a regular blender, pour your broth and veggies in in batches, blending until smooth and uniform.  Either way, heat it through over medium heat to finish.

Have a slice of bread on the side to dip/mop up extra soup, and enjoy a good taste of summer!

In true Wisconsin fashion, the rest of fall appears to have decided to just fuck off and winter has just decided to show up early. Earlier in the week, we had our first hard frost and some of the leaves on the trees were still green when it happened.  I woke up to a carpet of green leaves covering my entire backyard.

The abrupt drop into cold, plus the rising levels of stress at my current job, mean that it’s time to break out the heavy duty soups, and this is one of them.  I had to table this soup for about a year, cause I associated it with being really sick (like, flu sick), but there’s been enough time to break the association, hopefully. EDIT: NOPE.  Fuck you brain.  Prepping the carrots takes a lot of legwork, but it’s worth it.

I also added a small dash of cinnamon and cardamom at the tail end of this recipe; as far as I can tell, it turned out pretty good, and doesn’t clash/overwhelm the other flavors.

Carrot Soup with Miso and Sesame

Ingredients

  • 2 T olive oil
  • 2 lbs carrots, peeled and sliced thin
  • 1 large onion (I used half), chopped
  • 7 large garlic cloves, smashed
  • 4 c vegetable stock (get a 32 oz box of it and you’ll be good)
  • 1 T ginger, peeled and grated
  • .25 c white miso paste
  • drizzle of sesame oil

Peel and slice your carrots (this will take a while, I got probably closer to 2.5 lbs from the farmer’s market, and this took the better part of 45 minutes), and follow it up by chopping your onion and smashing your garlic. By the time you start your garlic, heat your olive oil in a large pot over medium heat.  Add your carrots, garlic, and onion, and cook for ten minutes, until your onion is translucent.  Add your vegetable stock and grate the peeled ginger directly into the soup.  Cover, and then bring to a simmer, and simmer for a half hour, until your carrots are fork tender.

Pour your soup into your blender in batches (I did about an equal amount of carrots and stock each time, in two batches), and puree, from low to high. Again, be sure to only fill up your blender about 60% of the way, otherwise, soup will come flying out, and there will be pain and suffering.  Add the pureed soup back to your pot.

Now, the original recipe recommends whisking together the miso paste and a half cup of the soup in a separate bowl. I probably should’ve done this.  Instead, I just added it straight to the soup and stirred vigorously.  The soup still turned out great.  Then add your salt and pepper to season, and stir in your sesame oil!

It was tasting a little on the bland side still at this point, so I added the cinnamon and cardamom to experiment, in very small dashes, and it seemed to warm things up a bit and not clash horribly with the other flavors. Will fully report back on this.