This is a great quick summer toast, combining brie, bread, and tomatoes for the perfect morning flavor combination. Might have to try this before heading out the door for work in the morning here while we’ve still got good tomatoes. 

Heirloom Tomato and Buttered Brie Toast with Thyme and Honey

Ingredients

  • Slices of crusty bread of choice (sourdough, roasted garlic, whichever you like best!)
  • 2 T butter
  • brie, sliced to taste (or in these cute little brie bite sizes that I got from Trader Joe’s)
  • fresh thyme if you have it, otherwise, dried thyme to taste
  • heirloom tomatoes of varying sizes, sliced thin
  • honey and olive oil, to drizze
  • sea salt and pepper to taste

Preheat your oven to 450. Rub the slices of bread with butter, and place in the oven for three to five minutes, until lightly toasted. Layer on the brie and tomato slices, and then return to the oven to cook for five minutes, until the brie is melted and the tomatoes wrinkle slightly. Turn on the broiler for one minute after the brie is melted to crisp it up a bit. 

Then, add your thyme (and oregano, if you’re me), and drizzle with honey and olive oil, and a bit of sea salt and fresh ground pepper. And then, enjoy your quick summer breakfast!

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This is an amazing summer dish that I can’t recommend enough, especially now that we’re at the height of tomato season. I originally paired California black figs with this, but now that I’ve tried some more figs, I think that tiger figs might actually have gone better. (I’ve never tried figs before this summer. I’m still learning.)  Throw these roasted tomatoes in with burrata, and the end result is goddamn amazing. 

Marinated Roasted Cherry Tomatoes with Burrata and Toast

Ingredients

  • .25 c olive oil
  • 2.5 c cherry tomatoes of various types, halved
  • 2 T balsamic vinegar
  • sea salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
  • 12 fresh basil leaves, torn
  • dash of thyme (fresh if you have it, dried if you don’t)
  • 3 cloves minced garlic
  • pinch red pepper flakes
  • dried Greek oregano to taste
  • fresh figs, halved, to taste
  • 2-3 balls burrata
  • slices of sourdough, roasted garlic, or crusty bread of choice
  • olive oil and garlic clove for the toast

Preheat your oven to 225, and half your cherry tomatoes. drizzling with olive oil, sea salt, and fresh ground pepper. Slow roast the tomatoes for three hours, until they’re nice and wrinkly and juicy. Then, mix together the olive oil, balsamic vinegar, sea salt and pepper, basil, thyme, garlic, red pepper flakes, and greek oregano. Add in your tomatoes, toss to coat, and marinate for 2-4 hours at room temperature, or just toss them in the fridge to absorb the flavors. 

When you’re ready to eat them, take your slices of bread, rub them in olive oil and a halved garlic clove. Hold your toast over an open flame, or in a grill pan, and heat until it’s lightly charred on each side, about 2-3 minutes a side. 

Slice your figs, layer them in a bowl with the burrata ball, layer the cherry tomatoes on top, and have a piece of toast on the side to dip into all the various juices, and enjoy the resulting amazingness!

Tried this on a whim last weekend, as I’ve been on a creme brulee kick lately, or at least the idea of it, and the idea of that plus french toast sounded grade A amazing. I think this needs another go around to get it perfect, especially with the topping. Maybe caramelizing the sugar will work better under a broiler, or with a blowtorch? Any suggestions would be appreciated. 

Seriously, though, be sure to flip the toasts to get the perfect goldenness to it, and and have some fresh berries to make it even more amazing (these are Tay barries, a cross between raspberries and blackberries). I also used a loaf of shokupan (a type of Japanese milk bread) instead of brioche, and I still think it tastes amazing. Plus, odds are you’ll have some left over, for some lovely breakfasts during the week. 

Creme Brulee French Toast

Ingredients

  • 1 loaf rich bread of choice (again, Deb recommends brioche, I used shokupan, sliced to about an inch or so thick)
  • 1 1/3 c whole milk
  • 2/3 c heavy whipping cream
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1/3 c white sugar
  • pinch fine sea salt
  • 1 T alcohol of choice (original recommended Grand Marnier, I went Kahlua)
  • 1 T vanilla extract

Topping

  • 2/3 c white sugar

If your bread isn’t already sliced, slice it into generous, thick slices – Deb recommends 1.5 in thick slices, my loaf was cut into 1 in slices, about 9 slices total. Whisk together the milk, heavy whipping cream, eggs, white sugar, sea salt, booze, and vanilla extract. If you want to use a vanilla bean, you can do so – just follow Deb’s recommended steps for whisking in the vanilla bean scraping in the linked recipe. 

Preheat your oven to 325. Take a rimmed tray or pan that will fit as much of your bread as possible (I ended up going with two separate glass pans, and even those weren’t the greatest fits, as you can see), lay out the bread, and pour the custard over it. Let the slices absorb the custard for a half hour, flipping over about halfway through to ensure every side is soaking up the custard evenly. (You can also toss this in the fridge overnight to soak if you’re so inclined, and you won’t need to flip them if that’s the case.)

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper if you have it (I do because the people before me in this apartment left a lot of stuff, hallelujah), and space out the french toasts so that there’s juuust enough space that they can breathe a bit. Bake for about 30 to 35 minutes, flipping halfway through so that each side gets a lovely golden sear to it (I didn’t flip them, and I think they look better with both sides seared). You’ll know they’re ready when you lightly slice into the center of the bread and twist, and no wet custard comes out. 

About five minutes out from the toast being done, take a small, heavy, completely dry pot and melt 2/3 c white sugar over medium heat, stirring with a fork, and until it’s fully melted and the color of honey (see pic five). Time this so that this happens as soon as the toasts are done. Remove the bread from the oven, and then drizzle about 1 T of the caramel over the toasts, attempting to do so evenly (I just ended up doing a fancy drizzle). 

Add berries, and voila – a lovely, decadent weekend breakfast. 

(If anyone’s tried the broiler method for caramelization that Deb mentions, please let me know if it worked for you – I want to try that next time. Or maybe the hot spoon method would also work.)

Want a simple, quick, savory meal that will make your place smell delicious, and will include stuff you likely already have on hand? Then look no further than this. I’ve had puttanesca sauce on pasta before, but the idea of making the sauce into a shakshuka type dish never occurred before Smitten Kitchen put this recipe up. And let me tell you, it is afuckingmazing. So, pick up some diced tomatoes and kalamata olives, and give it a try. 

Eggs in Purgatory Puttanesca
Lasts 3 meals, if eating by yourself

Ingredients

  • 2 T olive oil
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 2 T-ish pitted kalamata olives
  • 1 t capers, drained and rinsed
  • 1 anchovy filet (add a few more if you want a more savory flavor)
  • 1 T dried Greek oregano
  • pinch red pepper flakes
  • 1 14 oz can diced tomatoes (I went with fire roasted, will probably go with 2 cans next time)
  • sea salt to taste
  • 1-4 eggs
  • .25 c grated parmesan (or, if you have it on hand, parmigiano-reggiano)
  • 1-4 slices of bread

Heat your olive oil in a medium sized pan over medium heat. While the pan warms, take your garlic cloves, kalamata olives, capers, anchovy, oregano, and red pepper flakes, and mince them together until you have a nice small pile. Take the heap, and add it to the pan, stirring and cooking for two minutes, until nicely fragrant.  Slowly add in your tomatoes, and a bit of sea salt, and lower the heat to medium low, stirring and simmering for five minutes. Take a taste of the sauce, and see how you like it. 

Then, make small indentations into the sauce, and crack your eggs into it. Cover the whites with sauce and cheese, and then cover and cook for five minutes, until the whites have set. If you want to toast your bread, now is a good time to do so; if you have a gas stove, just toast it over the burner, or toast it under the broiler for a few minutes. 

Then, scoop out your sauce, and an egg, into a bowl with your bread, and enjoy!

This just in: converting a recipe back from being vegan and gluten free is difficult sometimes. However, the resulting bread that I got out of this? Amazing, and definitely going into the regular rotation once persimmons are back in season. (If you want the original gluten free and vegan version, it’s linked below.)

Persimmon Spice Bread

Ingredients

Bread

  • 2.5 c flour
  • 1 c sugar
  • 2 t baking powder
  • 1 t baking soda
  • 2 t cinnamon
  • 1 t nutmeg
  • 1 t ground cloves
  • .5 c milk
  • .5 c vegetable oil
  • 1 t vanilla extract
  • 1.5 c persimmon puree (you should be able to get this from about 4 large ripe persimmons)
  • 1 persimmon, sliced thin (I used about half of one)

Vanilla Glaze

  • .5 c powdered sugar
  • 1 t vanilla extract

Take your persimmons, skin them, and puree the fruit in the blender. Save half of one, and slice it into small slices. (If your persimmons are ripe enough, this will not be an issue. For Hachiyas, you want them super ripe, borderline soft. For Fuyus, you want them firm.)  Preheat your oven to 350. 

In a bowl, whisk together your dry ingredients, followed by the persimmon puree, then the milk, vegetable oil, and vanilla, until you have a coherent dough. Transfer the dough to your loaf pan, top with the persimmon slices from earlier, and bake for an hour at 350. 

While the bread bakes, whisk together your powdered sugar and vanilla to make the glaze. Once the bread has been removed from the oven, let cool for at least fifteen minutes before drizzling the glaze on top.

Looking for a simple, quick, delicious breakfast? I recommend this. This takes five minutes tops to throw together, and then just throw it in a container, and take it to work with you, and you’ve got a perfect breakfast, carbs and protein and a bit of sweetness.

Pro tip: be sure to use real thick bread – I picked up a loaf of thick-cut shokupan (a Japanese sandwich bread made with milk, fantastic stuff) from Mitsuwa in IL when I was down there the other week for C2E2, and it was the perfect size. And in terms of getting the perfect sized hole, I used a beer flight cup that I had from a local beer festival, and it got the perfect size. 

Eggs in a Hole
Makes one slice

Ingredients

  • 1ish T butter
  • 1 slice thick bread (I used shokupan)
  • 1 egg
  • brown sugar and sea salt to taste

Melt your butter in a small pan, let it get bubbly, but don’t let it brown. While the butter melts, take a slice of thick bread and make a two inch or so hole in it (I used a beer flight cup to make mine).  As soon as the butter starts to bubble, take one side of the bread and cook until golden brown (a minute or two tops). Then, flip the toast, take your egg, crack it into the hole, and let it cook on the stovetop until the white sets, and sprinkle with brown sugar and sea salt. 

As soon as the white sets, take it off, and enjoy! The yolk will still be perfectly runny in the center. 

This one was a bit of work to put together, but honestly, it was worth it. The bread came from a one-off batch of beer bread that the people who do my sourdough at the farmer’s market came out with a few weeks ago.  The hummus and soft eggs both come from existing recipes that are linked in their listing in the ingredients.

And honestly, the rest I winged, and made a few changes to.  Either way, the resulting breakfast was utterly perfect.  If slightly long on the title; anyone with any ideas on how to shorten it, I’m all ears.

Dukkah is another new and interesting spice blend I recommend; I got mine from the Spice Sage, as no one around here does it.

Soft Eggs with Hummus, Roasted Olives, Tomatoes, and Capers, Goat Cheese, and Dukkah
Lasts appx five days of breakfast in the amts I made it

Ingredients

  • equal amounts cherry tomatoes, quartered; kalamata olives, whole; capers (mine was appx .5 c on all)
  • olive oil
  • soft goat cheese
  • Roasted Garlic Hummus
  • bread
  • soft eggs

Preheat your oven to 400, and combine your quartered cherry tomatoes, kalamata olives, and capers with olive oil in a small baking dish. Roast for 20 minutes, and remove.  Mix your goat cheese in with the roasted salad.

Take a slice of bread, and spread the hummus over it. Put a soft egg on top, splitting it so that the yolk spills over it. Sprinkle dukkah on the bread. Scoop some of the salad, and sprinkle the dukkah on that.

And then enjoy your slightly nontraditional breakfast!