Deb posted this recipe over on Smitten Kitchen right as I was starting to plan Christmas meals and such, and really, this was utterly perfect timing. My da has a waffle iron (I don’t yet but that may be changing), and the idea of her Gramercy Tavern gingerbread in waffle form is utterly amazing. (Only used buttermilk in these, but next time? Absolutely using stout.) Not really sure how accurate the output on this was, as I split the batter to make a less gingerbready version for some of my sisters. Regardless, this was the perfect way to wake up Christmas morning. 

Deep Dark Gingerbread Waffles

Ingredients

  • 1 c flour
  • .75 t ground cinnamon
  • 1 T ground ginger
  • dash ground cloves
  • dash nutmeg
  • 1.5 t baking powder
  • .5 t baking soda
  • pinch sea salt
  • .5 c (really, shitton of options here – I used buttermilk, apple cider, yogurt thinned with milk, and even stout beer)
  • .5 c molasses
  • .5 c dark brown sugar
  • .25 c white sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 3 T butter, melted

Whisk together your flour, spices, salt, and baking sugar and powder.  In a smaller bowl, whisk together the molasses, dark brown and white sugar, egg, butter, and your additional wet ingredient of choice, until mixed together. (If the butter cools a bit and makes little white splotches in the batter, this is okay.) Mix together the wet and dry ingredients until just combined.

Heat your waffle iron to medium, and then use a rubber spatula to spoon the batter into the iron until the individual waffle molds are about ¾ths full. Be sure you have it greased, or these WILL stick. Cook according to your waffle iron’s directions, maybe a minute or two more if the batter is particularly moist. 

To remove, open, let rest for about 30 seconds, and use a tong and spatula to lift the corners out and wiggle it gently out of the mold. Let cool a little further, and then sprinkle with powdered sugar (and syrup if you really want to, but they likely won’t need them). 

I cannot explain the full depths of awesome that this drink is. Maybe it’s because it’s so cold out, and I need to keep warm. Maybe it’s because I like buttered rum way more than I thought it did. maybe because it has the words “pumpkin spice” in it. But either way, this is a fantastic drink for a late fall edging into winter night.

Pumpkin Spiced Hot Buttered Rum
Makes 1 small pot, or enough to get you drunk if consumed over the course of an evening

Ingredients

  • 2 c dark rum (I used Kraken rum)
  • 1.5 c apple cider (obtained from the farmer’s market)
  • .5 c water
  • 1 T pumpkin spice flavoring
  • 2 T butter
  • .5 t vanilla extract
  • 1 T honey

Boil your dark rum, cider, and water. As soon as it reaches the boiling point, add the pumpkin spice, butter, vanilla extract, and honey. Then, keep on low, and slowly but surely enjoy through the night.

This ham was one of the first recipes I ever made from Inn at the Crossroads, and man, even though the original recipe is vague as hell, it does not disappoint. It will take a bit of time to stud the ham, and the roasting will take a bit out of your day, but if you have this going at the same time as a crock pot recipe, it won’t seem like any time at all.  

Yes, the ham does come out black towards the end (but it’s only the skin, it’s not burnt, and the underside is only dark bc of it cooking in the juices), but trust me, it’s fantastic. (Random note: I have never covered my ham in foil when roasting, this will probably change the blackening of the skin.  And even then it doesn’t make it completely inedible.)

Ham with Cloves, Honey, and Dried Cherries
Lasts a really long time; I’m coming up on week 2 of eating this

Ingredients

  • 10 lb ham (mine was 12, bone-in)
  • cloves enough to stud your ham
  • .5 c apple cider
  • .5 c honey
  • .5 c red wine vinegar
  • 2 large handfuls of dried cherries

Mix your honey, red wine vinegar, and apple cider in a small pot over medium heat, stewing for ten minutes.  Preheat your oven to 325 (mine was at 300), or whatever your ham’s roasting instructions indicate.  While that stews, stud your ham with cloves, and place it in your roasting pan (I use a glass pan).  Pictures 2 and 3 are a good guide for how studded it should be.  After ten minutes, your ham should be studded, and your glaze will be ready; pour it over the ham.

My ham’s roasting instructions suggested fifteen to twenty minutes per pound at 325 to roast; as this was 12 pounds, I skewed towards four hours, though I probably could’ve gone for the three and a half and been fine. Either way, your ham will come with instructions; they will probably be similar to the previous instructions, but check them before you go with what I suggest. Baste your ham at least once or twice an hour with a brush, to keep everything moist.

Once the ham is done, remove it to either a serving platter or whatever you’ll be storing it in, and then add your cherries to the remaining juices. You’ll cook these juices down until the cherries plumpen and the sauce thickens a bit (which was about twenty five minutes at 300 for me).  Once the sauce is done, store it separately as a side.

And then feast like you’re in King’s Landing.  Just hopefully not at the Purple Wedding.